Wow!

I didn’t dare use the word hope last week. In the last UK general election, in the Europe Referendum and in the US Presidential election I held onto optimism that the compassionate side of voters would win out, that a better quality of life for all people everywhere would be a greater wish than looking after localised interests. After those results I didn’t dare to start hoping that things would change in last week’s election (even, or especially, given the poll results leading up to voting day) and after the weekend I’m still unsure how much actually has changed – for now. Although the turnout in younger voters, if nothing else, offers a tentative hope for the future.

When I started blogging I was sure I would keep away from potentially controversial subjects – I’ve never told anyone how I have voted in real life (a very British upbringing – never ask anyone how much they earn, how they vote or their views on religion. Sex, drugs and music tastes were completely fair game though.) But things have changed radically in the last year and I posted about why my views on speaking up about potentially controversial issues have altered; it is actually my most liked blog post but I have a suspicion some people may have just liked the title and not looked further.

I hope things continue to change around us, that people no longer feel emboldened to commit hate crimes against those they see as different, that the vital services that keep the UK safe and healthy and educated receive more, not less, funding – and how can any of that even need to be stated?! Last week hope and compassion did indeed stand up strong, long may it last. Please.

Time for a cup of tea

Almost exactly a year ago, while still a very new blogger determined to keep to my weekly schedule, I found myself unable to post my prepared piece due to the murder of Labour MP Jo Cox. The events of the last two weeks in Manchester and London have weighed heavily on me as well – this time last week I was in London myself for a relatively rare evening of friendship, culture, drink and food. The atmosphere around the city was wonderful; a busy, hot sunny afternoon and evening. I didn’t myself notice the increased police presence that I knew was already in place after Manchester and the attack on Parliament earlier this year.

To say my heart aches for those whose lives have been cut cruelly short, and for their families, is not enough, but I’m not sure what else to say because it’s the simple, painful, endlessly sad truth.

We will fight terrorism in the only way Brits know; with dark humour, with determination and probably quite a bit of ineptitude. I hope we will remember everyone’s right to life, liberty, justice and human rights.

Today, 8 June is the 104th anniversary of the death of Emily Wilding Davidson. She died for the right to vote. A right that not everyone in the World is entitled to and yet which so many in the UK take for granted or fail to use. Now, more than ever, in the face of terrorism and also in the face of growing hatred and intolerance around the World, I hope all who can, do vote, and that love and compassion are stronger forces than fear and selfishness.

Season’s Greetings

A rather belated wish of Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to all. I shall see you again in the New Year – with luck. Until then I wish the world and everyone and everything in it peace, happiness and love.

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I was going to post a photograph of our decorated Christmas tree, but I can’t get a good photograph of it. Instead, I offer this. On a walk this week I paused to trace the intricate intertwined twigs overhead and became lost in the endless paths and patterns they made.

Stark. Bare. Beautiful.

I shall take more photographs in the same spot as they shimmer with the first green of spring, as they shade me in high summer, and as they turn to gold and begin to fall as the year turns again. Here’s to 2017.